Here are all of noyoucmon's jams.

Cattle and Cane

Cattle and Cane

by The Go-Betweens

I have posted solo tunes by Robert Forster and Grant McLennan but until now I've never posted a song by their band The Go-Betweens. These two men and their group have, over the years, become some of my most cherished artists. I sorely miss McLennan, who died in 2006. Forster just released Songs to Play, his first album in seven years. Cattle and Cane is a McLennan composition that first appeared on the band's 1983 sophomore album Before Hollywood. It went on to be named in 2001 by the Australasian Performing Right Association as one of the 30 most significant Australian songs of the last 75 years. This is a strangely specific award but reflects the song's value and importance. It is one of my favorite songs about memory. I am sad that This Is My Jam will soon be a memory and I give thanks and warm regards to everyone with whom I bantered on this site, and for all of the great music I learned about from you. Thank you, friends.

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Jammed: 25th Sep 2015

14 plays

14 likes

5 comments

Brando

Brando

by Scott Walker + Sunn O)))

25 Years of Jam comes to a conclusion: My #1 album of 2014 was Soused, the hotly anticipated collaboration between Scott Walker and Seattle drone-metal outfit Sunn O))). Ohio-born Walker, given name Noel Scott Engel, found fame after moving to London in the 1960s through his intellectual vocal-pop combo The Walker Brothers. Tremendously popular in the UK, the group split in 1967 due to internal tensions and Walker went solo; when they reunited in 1975 their material had turned darker and more experimental, dimensions that Walker would examine deeply in the second phase of his solo career beginning with 1984's Climate of Hunter. Soused is Walker's third full-length of the new century, and his third for the 4AD label; each of these has been increasingly daring and experimental in positively challenging ways, and all have high merits—but time must be spent getting there. Collaborating with Sunn O))) is a perfect fit. A one-off, likely, but oh, what a one-off.

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Jammed: 24th Sep 2015

7 plays

8 likes

6 comments

You Lust

You Lust

by The Flaming Lips

(Video is not safe for work!!) My #1 album of 2013 was The Terror by the Flaming Lips. I've followed the Oklahoma City eccentrics for 25 years; this is the first time I ranked them so highly. They have gone through many phases, and frankly my interest started waning in 1999 when the group started focusing as much attention on their carnival sideshow stylings as on the music. When they released The Terror it was a sea change. A bleak, dark atmosphere of nearly ambient music, predicated on this rambling statement by Coyne: "We want, or wanted, to believe that without love we would disappear, that love, somehow, would save us that, yeah, if we have love, give love and know love, we are truly alive and if there is no love, there would be no life. The Terror is, we know now, that even without love, life goes on...we just go on…there is no mercy killing." The truth in this brutal assessment appealed to me and the album delivered on it strongly. The Terror is their best album in ages.

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Jammed: 23rd Sep 2015

5 plays

5 likes

9 comments

Long And Wasted Years

Long And Wasted Years

by Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan is my favorite musical artist but it wasn't until 2012 that I named one of his releases my #1 album of the year. Tempest revived Dylan from a moribund string of albums—Together Through Life (2009) and Modern Times (2006) are, for my money, some of the biggest chores to sit through in the Dylan catalog. (His 2009 holiday album Christmas in the Heart was a delight, though, I still feel.) Tempest combines the rollicking R&B that began on 2001's Love and Theft and seems to be Dylan's new modern form with songs of deep emotion that I've not felt in his music for ages. The song I'm posting here is a particularly cutting tune, and one that hooked me hard upon its release. Dylan's since released a new album of standards, something as unlikely for him as a Christmas record, and it's very good as well. I hope we get to see more new Dylan works in the future.

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Jammed: 22nd Sep 2015

4 plays

5 likes

3 comments

Drover

Drover

by Bill Callahan

In 2011 my #1 album, leagues above the competition, was Let England Shake by PJ Harvey; back when I thought TIMJ was going to shut down on September 1, I posted a tune from that album. My #2 album, also leagues above the rest of the competition, was Kaputt by Destroyer. My second Jam ever, back in June 2012, was from that album. So now we're onto my #3 album of 2011: Lulu by Lou Reed & Metallica. Oh, how I longed to give you the 20-minute climax of that misunderstood album, "Junior Dad." But it's on Warner Bros., so of course it's blocked here. That leaves me with my #4 album of 2011, Bill Callahan's excellent Apocalypse. This is the most challenging album he's released under his own name (after a dozen years or so recording as Smog). It's a very rewarding album nonetheless. You'll just have to look up Junior Dad on your own!

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Jammed: 21st Sep 2015

5 plays

4 likes

2 comments

Hitchhiker

Hitchhiker

by Neil Young

25 Years of Jam continues: My #1 album of 2010 was Le Noise by Neil Young. This solo electric album—just him and the atmospheres created by Daniel Lanois's production—is an incredible document and, for my money, Young's best album since 1994's Sleeps with Angels. I take this song to be autobiographical. If you're one of the folks who's had enough with the sound realms of Lanois production, give this a shot. Sink into it and listen to the words. Young is going places on this album that he's never been before on record. Le Noise is his finest work of this century.

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Jammed: 20th Sep 2015

11 plays

5 likes

2 comments

Temecula Sunrise

Temecula Sunrise

by Dirty Projectors

My #1 album of 2009 was Bitte Orca, 6th LP by Brooklyn experimentalists Dirty Projectors. Led by Dave Longstreth, they play a highly arranged sort of rock and roll recalling conventions of chamber orchestras. Instead of standard chords and riffs, they use complex structures, one person to a part—the rhythm section doesn’t lock into a groove, for example—yet it isn’t jazz; it uses the architecture of pop (verses, choruses, etc.) in songs whose rhythms and melodies might seem erratic. I also hear aspects of Malian music, like the traditional folk performed by, say, Sidi Touré. (A key exception to all this is the single Stillness Is the Move, sung by Amber Coffman & Angel Deradoorian, which sounds like a chart-riding soul-pop number.) Bitte Orca is a difficult, love-it-or-hate-it sort of album. I didn’t care for the follow-up, 2012’s Swing Lo Magellan, and I’ve not kept up with them. Even if they remain frozen in 2009 amber, Bitte Orca remains a gem.

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Jammed: 19th Sep 2015

4 plays

4 likes

4 comments

The Opening Act

The Opening Act

by Drive-By Truckers

25 Years of Jam Continues: My #1 album of 2008 was the seventh album by Drive-By Truckers, Brighter Than Creation's Dark. I just posted a track from their '03 album Decoration Day, but a band with three lead singers has plenty to draw from. This is the first album that DBT released following the '07 departure of Jason Isbell; it does, however, feature his then-wife Shonna Tucker on bass. Tucker joined the group as a full-time member in '03 after guesting on upright bass on Decoration Day; here, she replaces Isbell as the band's third writer and singer. She would go on to leave the band in 2011. Brighter Than Creation's Dark is heavily restricted here and only two cuts from it are available; the video for the one I prefer, Mike Cooley's song A Ghost to Most, has some glitches; so, there's nothing left but Patterson Hood's ballad of life in a band whose star has faded, The Opening Act. It's a good song, too.

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Jammed: 18th Sep 2015

4 plays

2 likes

3 comments

Gronlandic Edit

Gronlandic Edit

by Of Montreal

My #1 album of 2007 was the sixth LP by Athens, Georgia's Of Montreal, led by sole constant Kevin Barnes, who pulled back from big lineups to craft his increasingly complex albums largely by himself beginning with 2004's Satanic Panic in the Attic. These virtually solo albums flaunt complex, multi-tracked arrangements and borrow heavily from ’60s-era psychedelic pop. Hissing Fauna is dense in execution and lyrical content. The quixotic, elaborate style of other recent Of Montreal LPs remains, but the manic bubblegum sound is complemented by prominent servings of modern electro-funk. Much of Hissing Fauna is deeply personal, examining Barnes’s separation from his wife, a self-imposed temporary isolation in Norway, and reliance on antidepressants. I wanted to give you the album's centerpiece, the 12-minute The Past Is a Grotesque Animal, an intense depiction of his marriage's tumultuous breakdown, but it's blocked here. For me, this album is the high-water mark of Barnes's career.

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Jammed: 17th Sep 2015

2 plays

1 likes

1 comments

3000 Flowers

3000 Flowers

by Destroyer

2006 closed with Destroyer's Rubies—the sixth album by Dan Bejar's musical project Destroyer to receive a wide release—being named my #1 album. I stumbled into Bejar's work when I found a used copy of 2004's Your Blues and took a chance on it because it looked interesting. I then learned the album was a real outlier in the Destroyer catalog, having been recorded using MIDI orchestration. A follow-up EP, Notorious Lightning & Other Works, was released and featured several Your Blues songs in a rock setting. I was intrigued by both this conceptual continuity and Bejar's gripping, intellectual lyric writing, and continued to explore the catalog. Destroyer's Rubies (the full title includes the band's name) was the first Bejar album I bought upon release and it absolutely floored me. He has since released three more Destroyer albums, and after the gloss of his last two Rubies now seems downright rustic to me. This is one of the more rocking tunes on the record.

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Jammed: 16th Sep 2015

4 plays

4 likes

5 comments

Bird Gehrl

Bird Gehrl

by Antony and the Johnsons

25 Years of Jam continues: My #1 album of 2005 was the second album and breakthrough recording of Antony and the Johnsons, I Am a Bird Now. Antony Hegarty named his group after late transgender activist Marsha P. Johnson, and constructed a sparse, piano-based sound featuring his theatrical, almost operatic singing voice. I Am a Bird Now is a stark, soulful set of songs addressing gender identity, dysphoria, and psychic ascension from traditional concepts of sexual classification. Death is a theme on the album, though it is often followed by a second birth—that of the soul and sexual spirit. This is most pronounced in the song I've chosen here, album closer Bird Gehrl (its odd spelling is sometimes shown around the Web as Guhl or plain old Girl). Hegarty’s compositions on I Am a Bird Now speak to the ecstatic truths of individual identity, with a command seen in few other singers of the time. See my full review at http://www.noyoucmon.com/2010/07/59-i-am-bird-now.html.

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Jammed: 15th Sep 2015

6 plays

5 likes

2 comments

Neighborhood #2 (Laika)

Neighborhood #2 (Laika)

by Arcade Fire

25 Years of Jam continues: In 2004 my #1 album was Wilco's A Ghost Is Born, the challenging follow-up to Yankee Hotel Foxtrot; I find those two albums to be the band's joint pinnacle, but I just posted them two days ago. In their place today we have another contender for top album of '04, Arcade Fire's full-length debut Funeral. The group has now gone on to huge heights and is a somewhat polarizing act in the indie world; it seems the more time goes by, more people get bitterly opposed to Arcade Fire. I suppose they are kind of ground zero for the endless flood of earnest bands who substitute anthemic chants of "woooahhh-ohhh-ohhh" for actual songwriting, but Arcade Fire can write a hell of a tune on top of that and I still think Funeral is the best example. Times were different then: I bought this at Tower Records and it didn't even come out on vinyl upon initial release despite being on indie stalwart Merge Records. This was a good three years before the vinyl resurgence.

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Jammed: 14th Sep 2015

4 plays

3 likes

2 comments

Outfit

Outfit

by Drive-By Truckers

Continuing 25 Years of Jam: My #1 album of 2003 was the fourth studio album by Athens, Georgia's Drive-By Truckers, Decoration Day. It was the follow-up to their incredible double-album examination of what they call "the duality of the Southern thing," Southern Rock Opera, and thus was anticipated heavily by fans and astute critics. On the tour supporting Opera, 22-year-old guitarist and writer Jason Isbell—significantly younger than the rest of the band—joined the group, and Decoration Day is the first DBT album featuring his songs. With Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley the group already had two world-class writers; Isbell made them, like the Beatles, a band with three great writers. I wanted to post the title track here, but Warner blocks it; instead you get his other song from the album, a great ballad of fatherly advice. Isbell wrote beyond his years. He left the band in 2007 and is now on his fifth solo album, having gained much acclaim with his 2013 breakthrough LP Southeastern.

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Jammed: 13th Sep 2015

6 plays

4 likes

3 comments

Poor Places

Poor Places

by Wilco

My #1 album of 2002 was Wilco's Yankee Hotel Foxtrot. If you don't know the album's story I beg of you to watch the fine Sam Jones documentary I Am Trying to Break Your Heart. The song I've chosen climaxes with an unnerving sample of a numbers station, also documented in the spectacular Conet Project. Look that up as well. And finally,this documentary using footage from D. A. Pennebaker's documentary Don't Look Back, which chronicles Bob Dylan's 1965 tour of the UK, is credited to Fabio de Oliveira Andrade and Clarissa. They deserve an award. Set aside five minutes and let this wash over you.

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Jammed: 12th Sep 2015

4 plays

1 likes

3 comments

Chains

Chains

by Mercury Rev

Mercury Rev's fifth full-length All Is Dream may boast their worst front cover, but it was my pick for #1 album of 2001. Coming after a gap of three years since their breakthrough release Deserter's Songs, All Is Dream expanded on the rustic majesty of its predecessor and reached full-blown symphonic heights that made it the band's lushest album to date and took them a million miles away from the abrasive psychedelic freakouts of their earliest work. (And in a bit of strange timing, All Is Dream was released in the US on the fateful day of September 11, 2001, and here I am posting it exactly 14 years later.) The current season is one of excitement for Mercury Rev fans, for they are on the verge of releasing their first album in seven years. I await it eagerly!

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Jammed: 11th Sep 2015

6 plays

4 likes

2 comments

You Said Something

You Said Something

by PJ Harvey

In 2000 my pick for #1 album was Sonic Youth's polarizing NYC Ghosts & Flowers. They continued their uncompromising departure from pop stylings to a divisive point that saw the nascent Pitchfork give the album a rating of 0 out of 10, one of the most embarrassing blunders that site has made. Since I just posted Sonic Youth two days ago, for this round of 25 Years of Jam I am going with another contender for 2000's best album, PJ Harvey's fifth full-length of new material— Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea. Harvey famously downplays this album in her catalog, writing it off as a pop experiment; in reality, it's one of her two finest works (the other being Let England Shake). It rightfully won the Mercury Prize and is generally recognized as a high water mark of her career. This song is particularly moving and its evocation of Manhattan rooftops and skyline became even more touching less than a year later following the terror attacks in New York.

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Jammed: 10th Sep 2015

5 plays

3 likes

2 comments

Harvest Festival

Harvest Festival

by XTC

The 13th album by pop heroes XTC was my #1 album of 1999. If fans yearning for new material feel like it will never come, the sensation isn't new; even 16 years ago it felt like we'd never see another XTC album. Their label deal with Virgin went deeply sour after the release of 1992's Nonsuch, involving financial rip-offs and the band "going on strike" when Virgin refused to release them. It finally happened and gave way for a flurry of activity. Apple Venus Volume One is an orchestrated collection of lush pop songs; this caused more strife, with guitarist Dave Gregory leaving the band over musical differences. While I'd hoped this album would be the beginning of a renaissance for the band, they issued a Volume Two—electric pop songs that would have likely pleased Gregory—and that was the last new material from XTC (except for an endless stream of instrumental and demo versions of the two albums). They appear to remain a 20th century phenomenon only.

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Jammed: 9th Sep 2015

5 plays

4 likes

4 comments

Sunday

Sunday

by Sonic Youth

At the end of 1998 I named Sonic Youth's tenth album A Thousand Leaves as my #1 record of the year. This was the first one the NYC noiseniks recorded in their own studio, and the result was a return to challenging, no-compromise pop experimentation after the more accessible work of their early major-label years. Looking back, this is a bit of an odd choice for #1; it's not a record that I have returned to very much at all. In fact, I don't remember all of it very well. Sunday is the record's most accessible number. There was a time when I believed that absolutely no band was cooler than Sonic Youth; the band has, sadly, dissolved, and those days are past.

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Jammed: 8th Sep 2015

6 plays

5 likes

1 comments

Let Down

Let Down

by Radiohead

My top album of 1997 was OK Computer by Radiohead. This was an unexpected choice for me, as at that point I couldn't imagine buying an album by "that 'Creep' band," but my brother had road-tested their sophomore effort The Bends and liked it and when I saw a new copy of the imported UK vinyl of OK Computer for a mere $9.99 in a local shop (?!) I took the plunge. Of course the band carried on to huge heights, and I went on to buy all their releases to the present day.

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Jammed: 7th Sep 2015

6 plays

6 likes

1 comments

More than I Can Do (Live)

More than I Can Do (Live)

by Steve Earle

My #1 album of 1996 was Prince's three-disc extravaganza Emancipation; I just posted him yesterday, though, so it's time to turn to another contender for the '96 top slot. Steve Earle's sixth album I Feel Alright was released to instant acclaim; it was his triumphant return to major-label work after a period in the wilderness dealing with personal demons. I remember vividly how Spin magazine gave it a perfect score of 10, only to leave it off their 1996 year-end list completely. In my household it remained a 10, though, and I still consider it his high-water mark. I'd followed Earle on and off—literally buying every other album of his, so it happened, since his 1986 debut—and saw him live twice in 1987 opening for Bob Dylan. His 1995 acoustic album Train a Comin' was fantastic and had me anticipating I Feel Alright with excitement before it came out, and I was not disappoitned. Warner blocks the album here, so I had to resort to a live version that's pretty faithful to the record.

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Jammed: 6th Sep 2015

5 plays

1 likes

1 comments

Endorphinmachine

Endorphinmachine

by Prince

My #1 album of 1995 was The Gold Experience by Prince. I came to Prince fandom late; can you imagine a time when a young rock buff would be too embarrassed to buy a Prince record in a store? I was, and it wasn't until I ordered Sign 'o' the Times from a record club that I realized what I'd been missing. By 1995 my interest in Prince had reached fever pitch; by this time, lots of his old fans had given up on him but I still recognized great stuff in the albums of his "lost period." In the mid-'90s he was fighting with his record company, Warner Bros., and The Gold Experience was cancelled as quickly as it had been announced and, in these nascent days of the public Internet, searching for a bootleg of the sessions was one's brightest hope if they wanted to hear this new work. He performed on Letterman promoting it even though it wasn't available; thus were the ways of the mysterious Prince. Finally, it was released, and I found it to be his best album since Sign 'o' the Times.

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Jammed: 5th Sep 2015

7 plays

4 likes

2 comments

Tractor Rape Chain

Tractor Rape Chain

by Guided by Voices

At the end of 1994 my #1 album of the year was Neil Young and Crazy Horse's excellent Sleeps with Angels—which I feel would reign as his finest work for another 15+ years—but later I determined that my favorite album of the entire decade of the '90s is another 1994 release, Bee Thousand by Dayton, Ohio, lo-fi heroes Guided by Voices. I didn't discover them until this, their seventh album; my brother and I quickly set out to collect as many of their albums and limited-edition singles as possible. I can't quite express how exciting and fun this was; GbV felt almost like a modern indie Beatles to me, and their music at the time was eminently playable and re-playable. Bee Thousand spent many, many hours on my stereo. And for those who may wonder, the title (and several other lyrics) refer to an agricultural process, another cryptic reference to the band's Midwestern upbringing.

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Jammed: 4th Sep 2015

4 plays

3 likes

2 comments

Mistress

Mistress

by Red House Painters

The music of Mark Kozelek and his band Red House Painters loomed heavily over my later college years. The emotional lyrical content of the songs was a perfect sanctuary for a very young man torn constantly between sensitivity and brashness. Appearing a mere 8 months after the group's first record—Down Colorful Hill, a collection of demos deemed by 4AD label head Ivo Watts-Russell to be a finished product after some remixing—the eponymous 1993 album Red House Painters (now often known as Rollercoaster) was a monolith. A double LP, it was my #1 album of that year and at decade's end I ranked it as #2 of the 1990s. It's been nearly 15 years since I played it; it's practically singular in my collection as an album that is just too psychologically demanding for me to play any longer. One day I'll revisit it. I've chosen a song here that tilts toward the side of brashness; it also appears on the album in a slow piano version. Here's the full band take.

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Jammed: 3rd Sep 2015

3 plays

3 likes

1 comments

Papa Won't Leave You, Henry

Papa Won't Leave You, Henry

by Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds

My pick for #1 album at the end of 1992 was Henry's Dream, the seventh album by Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds. The record is an astonishing expository achievement that feels like a concept record without claiming to be one. It is best heard front to back; its moods and dramatic tension make for one hell of a listen. When I want a Nick Cave album this is still the one I reach for. Here's the opening track.

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Jammed: 2nd Sep 2015

3 plays

5 likes

2 comments

Diamond Day

Diamond Day

by Lida Husik

At the end of 1991 no new album from that year had charmed me more than Washington, DC, singer-songwriter Lida Husik's debut Bozo. Released on Shimmy Disc, Bozo is cloaked in the hazy, half-speed psychedelia that label head and producer Kramer lent to most of his productions. Husik released nine albums in the '90s, all of which I found compelling and intriguing; her only public move since her last album in 1999 has been a digital-only single in 2006 called "Nuclear Soul." I'd be thrilled to see a new full-length from Husik. If I had to choose my top album of 1991 today, I'd likely go with Julian Cope's Peggy Suicide or Yerself Is Steam by Mercury Rev, but Bozo will always be a special favorite that reminds me of my days in college radio when there was no Internet and artists could remain mysterious when all you had was a murky album cover to stare at. For years I didn't even know what Husik looked like!

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Jammed: 1st Sep 2015

4 plays

2 likes

2 comments

Country Home (Live)

Country Home (Live)

by Neil Young and Crazy Horse

Now that TIMJ isn't going away until September 26, I'm going to count down the days with a song from each of my favorite albums of the last 25 years. 1990 saw the release of Ragged Glory, Neil Young's 23rd album of new material and his sixth with esteemed backing band Crazy Horse. Kurt Loder said it best in his Rolling Stone review: "I guess Neil Young is the king of rock & roll. I don't see anybody else on the scene standing anywhere near this tall nowadays." The album is a scorching 62 minutes of guitar music pushed onto one vinyl platter that continued an excellent streak of Neil Young music, following the 1989 releases Eldorado (a Japan-only EP) and the blistering, vital Freedom. Warner blocks the original material on this site, so I've got to go with a live version of unknown provenance. I'd have liked to give you one of the album's 10-minute-plus jams, but there's just a mess of clips to sort through. Here's the LP's opening cut, Country Home.

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Jammed: 31st Aug 2015

5 plays

4 likes

3 comments

Everybody Does It in Hawaii

Everybody Does It in Hawaii

by Jimmie Rodgers

Countdown to End of TIMJ #18: My interest in pre-WWII music began in earnest when the American Anthology of Folk Music won a 1997 Grammy. Compiled by Harry Smith in the 1950s, in its original incarnation it was technically a bootleg, but its impact was enough to get it fully licensed and reissued by the Smithsonian. From there I opened my mind's doors to tons of seminal pre-war artists of different genres and I continue to explore further (and I don't believe I've posted any on TIMJ until now). My latest thrill in this area is Jimmie Rodgers. I've read about him since childhood but it wasn't until my brother upgraded to the Rodgers Bear Family box and gave me a 5-disc set on JSP that I learned how much I dig the Singing Brakeman. This song's been firmly lodged in my head all week; it was recorded 86 years ago this month in Dallas, Texas.

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Jammed: 28th Aug 2015

6 plays

3 likes

7 comments

Jim Cain

Jim Cain

by Bill Callahan

Countdown to the End of TIMJ #17: Another of my favorite artists whom I haven't posted on the site yet is Bill Callahan. This Maryland-born singer-songwriter recorded a dozen albums from 1990 to 2005 under the name Smog. These recordings saw him progress from a self-taught bedsit experimenter to an elegant songsmith; the transition is startling if you only know his newer music and then dip back into his earliest works without context. In 2007 he started using his given name for his albums; this comes from his second Callahan-credited LP, 2009's Sometimes I Wish We Were an Eagle. I would wager the song is named for hardboiled crime novelist James M. Cain; its sound, though, is a million miles from the worlds of Double Indemnity and The Postman Always Rings Twice. Eagle is Callahan's lushest LP, its string arrangements and calming atmosphere perhaps most effective on this particular tune. Callahan has since released two further studio LPs, a live album, and a remix record (!).

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Jammed: 27th Aug 2015

3 plays

2 likes

2 comments

Car Wash Hair

Car Wash Hair

by Mercury Rev

Countdown to End of TIMJ #16: Yesterday I posted a Flaming Lips tune from the days when Mercury Rev's Jonathan Donahue was in both bands; as I've never posted a Rev tune here I should do so now, especially as they're my preferred group between the two. The upstate New York group began their career with two zonked art-noise records with second vocalist David Baker before his departure and the transitional 1995 album See You on the Other Side, then the eventual development into a more stately concern beginning with 1998's Deserter's Songs. I'll always have a special love for those two early albums, Yerself Is Steam and Boces. Sony has a virtual lockdown on material from this era when it comes to this site, so choices are limited; this is a song appended to US CD versions of Yerself Is Steam. It's a rare example of a bonus track becoming one of a band's most well known songs.

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Jammed: 26th Aug 2015

7 plays

4 likes

2 comments

Gingerale Afternoon

Gingerale Afternoon

by The Flaming Lips

Countdown to End of TIMJ #15: I'm almost shocked that I've not posted anything by the Flaming Lips until now. While I've been a begrudging fan for the last 16 of my 25 years of following the group, I've continued to buy everything they do (crazy toys and download-only music excepted). Right now I'm revisiting their 1992 album Hit to Death in the Future Head; for the first time I am playing the 2011 US vinyl debut of the album. While it has been on my shelves waiting dutifully for over three years, it's no testimony to my opinion of the record. Hit to Death is easily my favorite Flaming Lips album. I saw them live in the early days of the '90s quite a few times, in small clubs, and I yearn for the days when they were simply a stunning rock and roll band. At this point, Jonathan Donahue of Mercury Rev was still in the band (he served in both concurrently), and he served well as a foil for frontman Wayne Coyne. I may have lots of issues with the Lips but they'll always be a favorite.

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Jammed: 25th Aug 2015

5 plays

4 likes

6 comments

The Glorious Land

The Glorious Land

by PJ Harvey

Countdown to End of TIMJ #14: PJ Harvey is a favorite of mine, but as she's not released any new music during my Jam tenure and I've not gotten on a kick with her records lately this is the first time I've posted her here. Let England Shake, her eighth studio LP, was released in 2011 to almost instant acclaim. The album's focus is the horrors of war and its impact on all whom it touches (apologies to @AheadByEcho who may have worded it exactly that way in his recent PJ Harvey post). This bold, challenging album was easily the greatest new album I heard in 2011 and it well may be the best one I've heard this decade (which I think I'm also plagiarizing from @AheadByEcho). I look forward to Harvey's next release!

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Jammed: 23rd Aug 2015

6 plays

4 likes

1 comments

Origins

Origins

by Tennis

Countdown to End of TIMJ #13: When you devote twenty-odd years to capturing your own listening statistics as I and my brother have done, you learn some weird things. One of the unexpected things I've come to understand is that Denver-based husband & wife duo Tennis is one of my most played and favorite groups of the current decade. Alaina Moore and Patrick Riley have released three full-lengths and an EP, all inspired at their roots by '60s girl-group pop (a perennial obsession of mine, another thing I've learned) but taken on interesting different tangents. This song, a contender for my favorite Tennis tune, comes from their 2012 sophomore LP Young & Old. This album was produced—unexpectedly, I thought—by the Black Keys' Patrick Carney. The two bands seem like oil and water but he added a very nifty element that suited Tennis quite well. I've seen Tennis live on half a dozen occasions now and I will always have time for their new music.

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Jammed: 22nd Aug 2015

3 plays

3 likes

1 comments

I Can See Elvis

I Can See Elvis

by The Waterboys

Countdown to End of TIMJ #12: I saw the Waterboys live in ‘13 & was so dazzled by the 25th anniversary takes on Fisherman's Blues songs that when they switched to new stuff I barely cared. When the new LP, Modern Blues, surfaced in January, I remembered titles from the gig: Still a Freak and Nearest Thing to Hip? Ill-advised stabs at sounding cool. Worse? I Can See Elvis. There’s already an endless string of songs about post-death King encounters. It's a notion so out of date I don't know why one would want to add to it. I didn’t plan to buy it, but seeing an affordable copy at my local shop I couldn't resist. Go figure—I loved the album, uncool titles and all, and frontman Mike Scott's entry in Elvis-spotting chronicles was really good (despite it also belonging to another played-out category: songs cataloging dead rockers, imagining them playing together in the great beyond—and with a spoken bit! Lord!). Even with all these odds, Scott pulls it off & Modern Blues is well worthwhile.

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Jammed: 21st Aug 2015

6 plays

4 likes

2 comments

The Remainderer

The Remainderer

by The Fall

Countdown to End of TIMJ #11: I've yet to post a song on this site by the Fall, who over the years have been one of my favorite groups. Frontman Mark E. Smith has obstinately recorded under the Fall brand since the clattering punk days of ’76, through countless lineup changes, including an ’06 tour during which half of the band defected. The sharpness of his always-acerbic tongue has dulled a bit in the last few years, but in the Jam era there has been a recent uptick in quality of Fall releases, beginning with the 2013 EP The Remainderer and then this year's new full-length (roughly the band's 31st), Sub-Lingual Tablet. (Hell, I even dug their 2014 concert album Live Uurop VIII-XII Places in Sun & Winter, Son; how's that for an album title?) I'm still feeling my way around that new album, which is quite good itself, but The Remainderer—whose title track I'm posting today—was my favorite Fall release in five years.

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Jammed: 21st Aug 2015

5 plays

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Salinas (Live from York Minster)

Salinas (Live from York Minster)

by Laura Marling

Countdown to End of TIMJ #10: Hampshire, England-born singer-songwriter Laura Marling has racked up five studio LPs and a live album in her 25 years and with these recordings has established herself as one of the 21st century's most shining new musical talents. "Salinas" originally comes from her 2011 third album A Creature I Don't Know; in the UK, the album was reissued on CD in 2012 with a bonus full-length, Live from York Minster (it was also issued as a standalone vinyl LP). This is the Marling composition that has affected me the most, but her already deep catalog is ripe with excellent compositions. Her newest album, 2015's Short Movie, is another strong set of songs that I recommend highly. Comparisons like this are usually silly, but I view Marling in the same league as Joni Mitchell and I can't wait to hear her thirtieth album someday.

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Jammed: 20th Aug 2015

4 plays

3 likes

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Less Air, More Tobacco

Less Air, More Tobacco

by The Chrysler

Countdown to End of TIMJ #9: 2nd only during the Jam era to my shock at a new 2015 LP by beloved group The Apartments was my amazement at the new 2013 album by my Swedish heroes The Chrysler. Their previous release was in 2007; they kept an almost non-existent Web presence and I figured I'd long heard the last of them. My brother found a page somewhere that told of a new album—released a year prior to his discovery! What's more, there were only 200 copies pressed...and the band still had some for sale. It saddens me to know this excellent band has made such little impact, but hopefully posting this here will turn at least one new soul onto the group. Their elegant rustic pop never fails to charm me. If you have to get one Chrysler album, start with their 2003 debut Failures & Sparks (reissued in 2005 with bonus tracks). If you want to try getting one of the 200 copies of Hands Across the Sea, go to http://floraochfauna.tictail.com/product/the-chrysler-hands-across-the-sea-lp.

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Jammed: 18th Aug 2015

5 plays

3 likes

4 comments

In My Eyes

In My Eyes

by Best Coast

Countdown to the End of TIMJ #8: Los Angeles duo Best Coast, led by Bethany Cosentino, released their third full-length album California Nights earlier this year. The group takes inspiration from '50s and '60s girl groups, which they've explored through various production approaches: the lo-fi fuzz of 2010 debut album Crazy for You, the misguided Jon Brion sessions of 2012 sophomore effort The Only Place that found them stripped of their essence, and then the 2013 EP Fade Away where they hit a stride allowing a solid studio sound without slickness or over-manipulation. This continues on California Nights, their finest work to date. The songwriting is still relatively simple and based on classic tough-edged pop forms, but the world will always have room for strong variations on this theme. I've known since day one that Cosentino was a very gifted writer and hope that the good run of the past couple of years continues with more fantastic pop records in the future.

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Get In My Eyes at Amazon

Jammed: 18th Aug 2015

3 plays

2 likes

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I Lie When I Drink (Live on Austin City Limits)

I Lie When I Drink (Live on Austin City Limits)

by Dale Watson

Countdown to the End of TIMJ #7: Somehow despite living briefly in Austin, Texas, and making half a dozen trips over the years to the SXSW Music Conference, I missed the boat on local boy (but Alabama-born) Dale Watson. The day after SXSW ended in 2013 I had the hotel TV on as I packed my bags, and a Watson concert was on. This was the song being played when I tuned in and it stuck with me. Now I've seen Watson live on two occasions and own a stack of his albums. I'd say that he's one of my favorite contemporary country artists, but as he'll tell you in concert he prefers to call his brand of music "Ameripolitan." Whatever he calls it, I certainly enjoy it and look forward to his next show in my town. This is from his 25th album (!), 2013's El Rancho Azul.

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Jammed: 17th Aug 2015

7 plays

1 likes

5 comments

In Your Bright Ray

In Your Bright Ray

by Grant McLennan

Countdown to the end of TIMJ #6: Australia's Go-Betweens remain among my most cherished groups, though they sadly came to a close with the sudden death of Grant McLennan in 2006. He and Robert Forster were the McCartney and Lennon of their time. I've yet to Jam a Go-Betweens tune, though I urge you to seek one if you're not familiar; in January of this year I posted a Forster solo number, so I return the favor tonight with my favorite McLennan solo tune. This is the title track of his fourth and final solo album, released in 1997. 2015 is a big year for Go-Betweens fans as a massive anthology of the first third of their career was released just this past winter. Long live the Go-Betweens!

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Jammed: 16th Aug 2015

6 plays

3 likes

3 comments

Collegiate Peaks

Collegiate Peaks

by Grandkids

Countdown to the End of TIMJ #5: On a trip to Champaign, Illinois, in 2012, I dragged a friend into a bar to listen to some random live music. The band turned out to be Santah, an excellent thinking person's pop combo on the verge of moving to Chicago; the group included siblings Stanton and Vivian McConnell. After snapping up their discography I concluded they were the most talented siblings working together in music at the moment. Imagine my astonishment when I soon learned that Vivian had her own band, Grandkids, that I wound up liking almost more than Santah itself! This is from their sole full-length to date, Timeshare (2013). Santah's new album Chico comes out in November; I will be jonesing for a new Grandkids album soon as well!  (I've Jammed Santah here twice, in September '12 and January '13...check 'em out!)

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Jammed: 14th Aug 2015

3 plays

2 likes

4 comments

The Wolf Is Getting Married

The Wolf Is Getting Married

by Sinead O'Connor

Countdown to the End of TIMJ #4: It's worth noting that Sinead O'Connor has continued to make noteworthy music throughout the past two decades. One of her finest albums from this period is 2012's How About I Be Me (and You be You)? It was O'Connor's first album in five years and contains this track, which I reckon to be the finest new love song I've heard during the This Is My Jam era. (Her most recent album, 2014's I'm Not Bossy, I'm the Boss, is another strong effort.)

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Jammed: 13th Aug 2015

1 plays

1 likes

4 comments

Islands (She Talks In Rainbows)

Islands (She Talks In Rainbows)

by Guided by Voices

Countdown to the End of TIMJ #3: One of the most unexpected and fun musical developments of the Jam era for me was the earnest comeback of Dayton, Ohio, mutant pop geniuses Guided by Voices. After a 2010-11 reunion tour, sparked by the 21st anniversary party of their label Matador, they decided to start recording for the first time since 2004; the results were a whopping SIX new full-length studio albums (and what felt like countless associated singles) before the band imploded again in 2014. In November '12 I Jammed a tune from one of the best of these LPs, Class Clown Spots a UFO ("Jon the Croc"); on the Fourth of July '14, I Jammed a tune from one of the weaker reunion LPs, Motivational Jumpsuit ("Planet Score"). Both of those tunes are sung by Robert Pollard; this time, I've chosen a blaster by the band's other singer/songwriter, Tobin Sprout. This one comes from another of the stronger GbV reunion albums, 2013's English Little League.

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Jammed: 12th Aug 2015

4 plays

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You Can Change

You Can Change

by Pearl Charles

Countdown to the End of TIMJ #2: One of many things I've loved about this site is the number of acts I've discovered who operate in the world of Bandcamp, cassette-only releases, and other DIY arenas. From other Jammers I've learned about numerous artists in these spheres whose music I have come to love: Pure Bathing Culture, Jungle, and Hibou, to name a few. Some of these artists have gone on to acclaim in more visible channels, but I was able to enjoy the ride along with them thanks to this site. I'll have to get accustomed once again to digging on my own. The latest such release that excites me is the 2015 debut cassette EP by Los Angeles singer/songwriter Pearl Charles. She has a strong soul voice, as this song shows, and on the 6-track cassette she presents a solid handful of memorable tracks. I'm partial to stompers like this one, but the six-minute "Idea to Her," which closes the EP, shows she is also strong at jazzy avant stylings. TIMJ, I'll miss making such discoveries here!

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Jammed: 11th Aug 2015

6 plays

2 likes

6 comments

August Hair

August Hair

by Robyn Hitchcock

In anticipation of the sad deactivation of This Is My Jam in September, I'll be posting new songs more frequently than my usual weekly pace. Here is a tune from Robyn Hitchcock's 1995 outtakes collection You & Oblivion; I get this stuck in my head every August.

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Jammed: 10th Aug 2015

6 plays

6 likes

2 comments

Continental Shelf

Continental Shelf

by Viet Cong

I tried to like the eponymous '08 debut by Calgary avant indie rockers Women, but it seemed unable to decide if it wanted to be truly experimental and struck me as a half-baked collage of sound. The group made one more album in 2010, which I didn't bother getting, and went on hiatus later that year. Guitarist Christopher Reimer died in 2012, ending any chance for further music. Later that year half of Women formed a new outfit, Viet Cong. I disregarded them out of hand, but earlier this year I saw them perform at a winter music festival and was sufficiently intrigued to buy the $5 cassette of their debut full-length. I wasn't fully won over at first, but I played it enough to warrant an upgrade to a real format; now it's one of my favorite albums of 2015. Viet Cong still walks that line between experimental and straight melody, but the grooves and songs trounce Women. I've gone back and listened to the old material and it still doesn't move me. I'm glad I took a chance on Viet Cong.

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Jammed: 7th Aug 2015

3 plays

2 likes

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Red Eyes

Red Eyes

by The War on Drugs

The War on Drugs is a sextet based in Philadelphia; their third album, Lost in the Dream, came out in the spring of '14 and has found them a wide audience and, recently, a deal with Atlantic Records. I finally got around to making my Best of 2014 compilation this week, and this is on it; the next day I lucked into a ticket to a sold-out show by the band. It was the third or fourth show of theirs that I've seen, and they remain my favorite working live rock act of the moment. Frontman Adam Granduciel plays guitar like Neil Young and this is something the world needs more of.

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Jammed: 31st Jul 2015

8 plays

5 likes

1 comments

Timothy

Timothy

by The Tallest Man on Earth

Swedish singer-songwriter Kristian Matsson has carved a trail over four albums from one-man acoustic work to full-band performances on his latest effort, Dark Bird Is Home, credited as always to the Tallest Man on Earth. Matsson's style--often compared, to his chagrin, to early Bob Dylan--is dense and melodic; he's the only single person (other than, er, Dylan) whom I've seen transfix a large crowd with only his voice and guitar. Dark Bird Is Home finds Matsson examining his recent divorce; "Timothy" asks achingly, of a man in a relationship, "Why are you so complicated?"

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Jammed: 24th Jul 2015

3 plays

3 likes

1 comments

Just Like Blood

Just Like Blood

by Sharon Van Etten

Brooklyn-based singer-songwriter and bandleader Sharon Van Etten has released four full-length albums since 2009, progressing from sparse acoustic music to full-band arrangements; despite high points Tramp (2012) and Are We There (2014), I never quite fall fully for her albums. There is an aspect of her music that sometimes seems like I'm hearing the same song over and over. Her confessional songwriting is occasionally stunning, but the arrangements too often tread repetitive ground. I wasn't very excited for I Don't Want to Let You Down, her new 5-track EP, but I'm often interested when artists choose the short form as canonical statement (as opposed to a simple single with bonus tracks; those get lost in the discographical shuffle). Add to it that one of the record's five tracks is a live version of a Tramp outtake, and on first glance it can seem like a stopgap. I was thrilled to find that, for me, this is SVE's most playable record. I've played this EP over and over this month.

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Jammed: 17th Jul 2015

8 plays

4 likes

1 comments

Guess I'm Dumb

Guess I'm Dumb

by Glen Campbell

Prior to Glen Campbell's career as a country maestro and the likes of "Rhinestone Cowboy" he was a member of crack L.A. sessioneers The Wrecking Crew. This found him working with the Beach Boys, including filling in for Brian Wilson on some tour engagements. When the Beach Boys turned down this Wilson/Russ Titelman composition, Brian gave it to Campbell to record. Released as a standalone single in 1965, it flopped and copies are now quite hard to find; I reckon it should have been a massive hit. Campbell's vocals soar on this fantastic examination of romantic ambiguity. Backing vocals are provided by Beach Boys protégées the Honeys, including Wilson's first wife Marilyn. Beach Boy Carl Wilson also plays guitar and provides backing vocals, along with members of the Wrecking Crew. I've been listening to this non-stop all week and give a tip of the hat to @MisterHapper whose posting of the song got me started on this kick!

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Jammed: 10th Jul 2015

10 plays

5 likes

8 comments

Surrey with the Fringe on Top

Surrey with the Fringe on Top

by Blossom Dearie

I've been spending a lot of time this year with the four-disc compilation The Verve Story: 1944-1994, which surveys the first fifty years of music released by the groundbreaking label by founder Norman Granz (encompassing pre-Verve work at his Clef and Norgran labels). Verve eventually broadened to include rock acts as wild as the Mothers of Invention, but this box focuses on jazz. Spanning vocal and instrumental jazz over the course of half a century and including heavyweights like Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Count Basie, Ella Fitzgerald, and many others, the box makes for a fine crash course in the American form. Verve was a monolithic label. As for my pick here, I have become bewitched by the voice of New York singer/pianist Blossom Dearie. Taken from her 1959 third LP Once Upon a Summertime, this version of the Rodgers & Hammerstein rollicker from Oklahoma! is turned under Dearie's command into a hushed, delicate love ballad.

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Jammed: 3rd Jul 2015

13 plays

6 likes

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That's Not Me

That's Not Me

by The Beach Boys

In an effort to catch up on magazines I've been mainlining the last three years of my favorite, MOJO. While my Beach Boys fandom has always been ambivalent at best and most of my attention for them has been spent on Brian Wilson's solo career, it's the June 2012 cover story on the group that I've enjoyed the most from my recent readings. I've begun reassessing Beach Boys material and this has begun with Pet Sounds; I've long appreciated that album, but this past week I feel as if I'm hearing it with fully open ears for the first time. I could have posted any number of songs from it but this one has been rising to the top quite a bit.

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Jammed: 26th Jun 2015

6 plays

4 likes

1 comments

Kill The Fun

Kill The Fun

by Haley Bonar

Manitoba-born and South Dakota-bred songwriter Haley Bonar has released six full-lengths, the latest being 2014's Last War on Graveface Records. While living in St. Paul she caught the ear of fellow Minnesota act Low, who took her on tour; her second album, 2003's The Size of Planets, was released on Low frontman Alan Sparhawk's Chairkicker's Union label. Bonar is an immense talent and her music deserves to be heard outside the limits of the small labels that have released her music. "Kill the Fun," the lead track from Last War, is the finest pop song I have heard in many months. I've scooped up the bulk of her albums and will be following her career closely.

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Jammed: 19th Jun 2015

6 plays

4 likes

1 comments

Free Jazz

Free Jazz

by Ornette Coleman

Ornette Coleman passed away on Thursday, June 11. Known primarily as a saxophonist but also a trumpeter and violinist, Coleman was a giant of the scene and his contributions to jazz were seismic. His 1961 LP Free Jazz was ground zero for experimental improvisation. It is a rare early '60s album best heard in stereo, not mono, as it was recorded with two different quartets playing simultaneously, one in each channel. The lineup includes major players including Don Cherry, Eric Dolphy, and Charlie Haden. When I made my nascent moves into learning jazz, this was the first album that I bought. It remains a colossus in music history as well as one of my favorite jazz records. The original album has one composition--the title track--running 37 minutes (the side break on the LP comes at 19:27). Here it is in its entirety. If you're interested in jazz at all I encourage you to just let it play through, maybe while you're doing something else. It's a contender for jazz's most important album.

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Jammed: 12th Jun 2015

10 plays

10 likes

2 comments

Folly

Folly

by Eskimeaux

Eskimeaux is a Brooklyn indie-pop group led by Gabrielle Smith. She spent several years recording bedroom demos, some of which found their way to artist-led download site Bandcamp; her first proper album, OK, was released last month. Smith also serves as keyboardist and backing vocalist for her friend Frankie Cosmos, another Brooklyn bedsit prodigy whose studio debut Zentropy was a highlight of last year (and was also released on Brooklyn's Double Double Whammy label). The two acts trace a similar path of introspective examinations of twentysomething life; Smith's Eskimeaux is more mournful in its sound, especially on quiet tunes like OK's opening song "Folly." I've been playing this album a lot during the past week and a half and the songs continue to make an impact. I look forward to more from Smith.

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Jammed: 5th Jun 2015

5 plays

2 likes

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Made Up In Blue

Made Up In Blue

by The Bats

I first heard Christchurch, New Zealand's jangle giants the Bats when I checked out a copy of their debut full-length, 1987's Daddy's Highway, from a library in Champaign, Illinois, some twenty-odd years ago. I always liked the album but didn't own a copy until Flying Nun reissued it on vinyl in 2011. Copies of that reissue came with a download card that included non-LP bonus tracks, including the 1986 EP Made Up in Blue. Here's the title track from that release.(Shortly after Flying Nun began reissuing titles in the US, the label entered into a licensing agreement with stateside indie Captured Tracks. That company has issued many New Zealand titles, including another version of Daddy's Highway in 2014. I can't vouch for whether the Captured Tracks version includes the bonus tracks like my 2011 copy, but the label has handled the reissue campaign erratically and I'd have been happier if Flying Nun had just continued to do it themselves.)

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Jammed: 29th May 2015

8 plays

6 likes

2 comments

Twenty One

Twenty One

by The Apartments

No new album's mere existence in recent years has surprised me more than The Apartments' new one, No Spell, No Song, No Madrigal. Frontman Peter Milton Walsh vanished from the business after the 1997 LP Apart. He'd led the Australian romantic-orchestral pop group since leaving the Go-Betweens in the late '70s; the 1995 Apartments album A Life Full of Farewells was a desert island disc for me for many years. In recent years I learned that he'd surfaced for a 7" single in 2011, finally reappearing in earnest for the 2013 radio sessions album Seven Songs, consisting of familiar favorites. Walsh had left the music industry after the death of his young son Riley. A crowdfunded effort to urge him to record and tour again has resulted in this new album. Twenty One is a devastating examination of Walsh's feelings about his son's young life being cut short. The album is by necessity darker than other Apartments efforts, but beautiful nonetheless and one of my favorites of the year.

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Jammed: 22nd May 2015

8 plays

3 likes

5 comments

Moonlight Mile

Moonlight Mile

by The Rolling Stones

I'm a casual Stones fan at best, but I wound up listening to Sticky Fingers this week as part of a project. It was the first time in many a moon that I'd played the album and it sounded great. This tune stuck with me the most. After this unexpected detour I'm really looking forward to the soon-to-come expanded reissue.

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Jammed: 15th May 2015

4 plays

3 likes

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Spin It On

Spin It On

by Wings

1979's Back to the Egg is the final album Paul McCartney recorded with his massively successful post-Beatles group Wings. It's also the McCartney album that has proved most mysterious to me over the years, as it contains none of his well known hits and I had no easy reference points; filling holes in my collection led me to the album this month. Pundits have said that Back to the Egg was Macca's response to punk; I don't see that, personally, but "Spin It On" is certainly a raver and it beat out lots of competition this week as the song whose grip on my brain was the tightest.

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Jammed: 8th May 2015

5 plays

2 likes

1 comments

The Body Electric

The Body Electric

by Hurray for the Riff Raff

On Thursday I saw New Orleans roots outfit Hurray for the Riff Raff, led by the immensely talented Alynda Lee Segarra. Since learning of the group a couple of winters ago I've tracked down three of their albums; this is from their latest, 2014's Small Town Heroes. It's one of the record's slower numbers, but after hearing the group do it live it's the one that's stuck with me the most. I'd put Segarra up there with Laura Marling as one of the most impressive young talents; both are in their mid-to-late twenties and produce work far beyond their years.

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Jammed: 1st May 2015

12 plays

5 likes

4 comments

Louie Louie

Louie Louie

by The Kingsmen

Jack Ely, vocalist on one of rock and roll's most iconic recordings, has died at age 71. "Louie Louie" was one of the first records I ever got my hands on; even before I knew its history, it became an all-time favorite of mine. Ely's raw take on the Kingsmen's 1963 cover of Richard Berry's 1957 tune unnerved so many people that the FBI launched an obscenity investigation on the song. Ely left the Kingsmen shortly after the song's recording, his place in rock secure. On Record Store Day this year, a DJ played the 45 at the shop where I volunteered  and it was one of the day's most exciting musical moments. Rest in peace, Jack Ely.

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Jammed: 29th Apr 2015

4 plays

4 likes

3 comments

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